DIAGNOSTIC PERFORMANCE OF INTRAORAL AND EXTRAORAL RADIOGRAPHS DISPLAYED ON TABLET COMPUTER AND LED MONITOR RETRIEVED USING VIRTUAL DESKTOP APPLICATION AND CLOUD-BASED PACS

Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology

Background

Information retrieval and sharing is key for today’s multidisciplinary patient care. Radiographic interpretation of conventional 2-D images is the standard protocol for most dental schools across the United States, and it is imperative to assess image quality on various display devices as well as image retrieval systems.

Objective(s)

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether common dental conditions seen on conventional 2-D intraoral and extraoral radiographs can be diagnosed with the similar accuracy on handheld tablet computer and LED display as on a dedicated radiology diagnostic display. In addition, to investigate the diagnostic and image quality of the radiographs retrieved over a virtual desktop application and a network computer.

Study Design

A total of 15 intraoral and 5 panoramic deidentified radiographs selected for this study showed a variety of common dental conditions and anatomic landmarks. Assessments were performed on a desktop computer and a tablet computer 10.5-Inch iPad Pro. All radiographs were retrieved on MiPACS and a virtual desktop application, Citrix Receiver. Each radiograph was assigned a case number and only a specific tooth was marked for diagnostic assessment. A total of 240 radiographs were assessed for general dental conditions and anatomic landmarks on panoramic radiographs.

Results

Cohen’s kappa was calculated and the kappa value ranged from 0.79 to 0.89, which indicated good to very good agreement between raters. A Kruskal-Wallis H test was performed, and distributions of identification of caries, caries surfaces, bone loss, and presence of periapical lesions were similar for all groups. Median scores were not statistically significantly different between groups as below (P > .05).

Discussion/Conclusions

IPad and LED monitor display performed equally on their ability to diagnose common dental conditions. In addition, there were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic ability of dentists examining images retrieved over a virtual desktop application (Remote electronic health record [EHR]) and a network desktop computer.
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